Patient Education
News Appearances



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Dr. Bassett is a prominent media resource for national news organizations as an allergy and respiratory specialist. He is a frequent contributor of news programming on ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX News, CNN, WCBS 880 News Radio and a contributor to the Associated Press in addition to other news organizations.

Dr. Bassett is Vice Chairman, Public Education Committee, American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. He also is Chair, Advanced Practice and Clinical Research, American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. He is bilingual in English and Spanish.

Recent Appearances and Mentions


Dr. Bassett's allergy and asthma web blog:
RevolutionHealth.com

Videos:
Hooked on Nasal Spray?
Fox News
Tips for choosing the right OTC allergy medicine for you
Woman's Day
Interview on WCBS NewsRadio 880
WCBS 880
Everything you need to know about food allergies, 1/16/08
TODAY msnbc.com
Interview on food allergies during Halloween season, 10/31/07
ABC News
Interview on women's food allergies, 10/15/07
Today Show
Interview on seasonal misery, 3/19/08
WCBS TV

LATE BREAKING NEWS:
Natural Remedies for Seasonal Allergies
Good Morning America/ABC News
Tongue Drops Cut Bee Sting Allergy
WebMD

Animal allergies:
HealthWatch: Introducing ... A Hypoallergenic Cat?
WCBS-TV
Mice May Add to Inner City Asthma Woes
WebMd
Is There Such Thing As An Allergy-Free Dog?
WCBS-TV

Antibiotic allergies:
Study Sheds Light On Penicillin Allergies Allergy May Not Recur As Often As Commonly Thought
CBS2
Penicillin allergy -- not forever?
MSNBC

Asthma:
Pollution Can Worsen City Dwellers' Springtime Allergies
NY1 News
Asthma Pill Cuts Intermittent Flare-ups in Kids
SexualHealth.com
Exercise Doesn't Worsen Asthma
Medicine.Net.com
Disinfect with diligence
The Jackson Sun
The Breath of Change
Advance for Physician Assistants
More People Sneezing and Wheezing? Climate Change at Work?
ABC News
Dying to Stay Warm
ABC News
Mite-Proof Covers Alone Don't Help Asthma
ABC News
Parents of asthmatic children grow concerned as the start of the school year approaches
WPIX-TV
Anticipating an attack
WABC7 Healthcast
Patients with chronic and allergic asthma may do better when steroid inhalers and other drugs are combined
WCBS-TV
Study Confirms Effectiveness of Drug for Persistent Asthma
KFVS
Allergy Medicine Under The Tongue May Be Preferred Method
WLNS, KOMO-4
Asthma Treatment: Old Better Than New?
WebMD
Inhaled Steroids Advised for Mild Asthma
WebMD
Many Kids With Asthma Suffering Needlessly
WebMD
Some Asthma Inhalers May Trigger Breathing Problems
Fox Carolina, CBS46, CBS6
Ed Begley, Jr. drives home clean air message
USA Today
Corticosteroid Treatment Effective for Children's Asthma
WCAX-TV
Managing Exercise-Induced Asthma
WebMD
Exercise Doesn't Worsen Asthma: Review Finds Some Benefits, Little Harm
WebMD
Two-Drug Strategy May Improve Asthma
FoxNews.com
Interview with allergy expert Dr Bassett, 4/11/07
Allergizer
Asthma and Cleaning Products
WHDH-TV-7

Children's allergies:
Bounce Carefully in the Ball Pit
WebMD
Soy Formulas May Not Prevent Infant Allergies Breast Milk Is Best for High-Risk Infants
WebMD
Halloween food safety
WTNH.com

Colds and flu:
Sanitizers Give the Upper Hand Against Colds
ABC News
Can Warm Weather Cause the Flu?
ABC News

Food allergies:
Possible Peanut Allergy Cure on the Horizon
Fox News
Living With Food Allergies
ABC News
A Kiss Before Sneezing
Time
Get The 'Skinny' On Artificial Sweeteners
CBS11-TV
The truth about artificial sweeteners
CBS 4 News At 5:00
Some foods can aggravate allergy symptoms
Fox News At 5
Sesame Allergies
WB11
Peanut Allergy Testing, Without the Nuts
Health Scout
Paging Dr. Gupta: Peanut Allergy in a Nutshell
CNN
New Food Label Rules Require Listing of Top Allergens
KUTV
New Food Labels to Help Allergy Sufferer's Avoid Reactions
KECY
New Food Label Law Eagerly Awaited
KOMO-4
Fighting Food Allergies: New efforts are making school a safer place for kids
MSNBC
Hypersensitivity to sesame seeds is increasing in the U.S.
10NBC
Fancy Coffees Could Trigger Allergies
NBC4.com
Study: Artificial sweeteners could contribute to weight gain
KFSM

General allergies:
The onslaught of allergies
FirstScience.com-UK
Video on women taking care of themselves
iVillage
Buckyballs could help fight allergies
BioEd Online
Allergies and asthma: How to breathe easily while on vacation
USA Weekend
11 Ways to Breathe Easy
Woman's Day
Girl's Nonstop Sneezing Baffles Doctors
ABC NEWS
Emergency Treatment for Severe Allergies
CBS2
Relieve Allergies the Natural Way
WebMD
Allergists or Nothing
Forbes.com

Insect allergies:
Tongue Drops Cut Bee Sting Allergy
WebMD
Best Bet Defenses Against Bugs
The Early Show on CBS
Bee Sting Allergies
WTNH

Mold:
Black Mold Drives Manhattan Woman Out Of Her Home
NY1 News

Remedies:
Allergy Alert: OTC Allergy Remedies
Fox News Health Blog

Seasonal allergies:
Allergy Alert: Don't Let the Bugs Bite This Holiday Weekend
Fox News Health Blog
Allergies or cold? Here's how to tell
N.Y. Daily News
Gardening with Allergies
Allergy & Asthma Advocate
Christmas Tree Allergies
abcNEWS
Certain Foods Can Aggravate Symptoms Of Seasonal Allergy Sufferers
NY1 News
Area Doctors Say Allergy Season Is Worst In More Than 50 Years
NY1 News
Doctor Explains Reasons For Severe Allergy Season
NY1 News
Treatments mean 'no one has to live in misery' from allergies
USA Today
Warm winter is no relief for allergy sufferers
WVEC.com
Winter No Relief for Allergy Sufferers
ABC NEWS
Unexpected Consequences of a Rainy Spring
ABC NEWS
Ragweed season starting up for allergy sufferers
TampaBays10
Be Prepared For A Very Harsh Ragweed Season
Avoid Hay Fever By Taking Preventitive Steps

WCBS-TV
Ragweed Season Means Trouble For Allergy Sufferers
Methods To Prevent The Allergic Symptoms Of Ragweed

CBS13
Ragweed Season Could Be Worst In 50 Years
CBS4
Survival Strategies for Brutal Allergy Season
ABC Good Morning America
Soaring Pollen Counts Spur Worst Allergy Season in Years
Forbes, CBS46
Natural Remedies for Seasonal Allergies
ABC News
Home Products Can Help Fight Allergies
WNBC.com
Dr. Max Gomez: Allergy Time Is Back - And Worse Than Last Year
WNBC.com
Get ahead of allergies
WTNH
Allergies will spring to life in Spring
WVEC
Allergy Season in Full Force
NBS San Diego

Skin, cosmetic and personal products allergies:
Metal allergy
MSN

Sublingual immunotherapy:
Tongue Drops Cut Bee Sting Allergy
WebMD

Sunscreen allergies:
Simple patch test can determine specific ingredient you're allergic to
WUSA-TV, KCTV5, WLKYTV, WFSB-TV, WBNSTV

Misc.
Sexy Surgeons, Dull Doctors?
ABC News
Winter Tough on Skin and Sinuses
NTV

Children's Seasonal Allergies


VISIT DR. BASSETT'S NEW WEB SITE: nyc-allergist.com


Are your children sniffling and sneezing this time of the year? Then chances are you, are dealing with seasonal allergies, not a cold! Your child may complain of itchiness of the eyes, nose and throat, frequent sneezing, coupled with a nasal stuffiness (which may even interfere with your child's sleep and daytime alertness).

If your kid has seasonal allergies, then his/her immune system is "overreacting" to the presence of spring and summer pollens and mold spores which, in most cases, triggers histamine release causing "allergy misery". It's also important to realize that a majority of children with asthma have underlying seasonal and indoor allergies.

Kid's with seasonal allergies may have a variety of physical features such as a horizontal crease over the bridge of the nose (as a result of repeated rubbing the nose), as well as facial puffiness/discoloration over the upper cheeks and below the eyelids known as "allergic shiners".

Some "allergy survival tips" to combat suffering during the allergy season are:

  • Know the Count: Check out the pollen count at www.aaaai.org/nab and consider having your child play indoors on high pollen days.

  • By the sea: Seasonal pollen levels may be lower by a body of water, so during peak allergy periods, schedule a vacation at the beach.

  • Pre-medicate with prescribed allergy and asthma medications before spending time outdoors at the park or in the garden.

  • Wash wisely: Wash and shampoo your child's hair in the evening and change clothing outside of the bedroom to reduce seasonal pollens that may accumulated in the hair and/or clothing during the day in the park, and thus reduce the stuff that may worsen allergy symptoms in the bedroom.

  • Look like a star! Get your child sunglasses to help reduce seasonal pollens from entering your eyes and eyelids.

In order to properly treat an allergic child it is essential to do allergy tests (simple, in-office skin tests) that will allow an allergist to "customize" a necessary treatment/avoidance regimen to provide relief to your child. There are many effective allergy medications on the market including non-sedating daily antihistamines, nasal steroid sprays (effective in reducing swelling and nasal congestion), leukotriene blocking drugs (new class of medication approved for seasonal allergies and asthma) and eye drops for the prevention and relief of watery and itchy eyes.

Parents, take your child to see an allergist before the seasonal misery takes hold for early and proper treatment. Remember, poorly controlled allergy symptoms may be associated with a negative impact on "learning" in the classroom. Wishing you and your children a "symptom-free" allergy season!

Indoor & Dust Allergies


VISIT DR. BASSETT'S NEW WEB SITE: nyc-allergist.com



Many people recognize allergy symptoms such as a runny or stuffy nose, itchy, watery eyes and sneezing (allergic rhinoconjunctivitis) from dust exposure related to common household chores such as vacuuming, sweeping, and dusting. House dust exposure can also trigger asthma symptoms such as wheezing, coughing, chest tightness and shortness of breath.

Why does house dust cause allergic reactions?

House dust is actually a mixture of many substances. Its content may vary from home to home, but there are certain components that are consistently recognized as the trigger of allergies:
  • Dust mites
  • Cockroaches
  • Fungi (Mold)
  • Animals
To trigger an allergic reaction all of these can cause a response in the immune system which results in the production of a special antibody (Immunoglobulin E or IgE) that brings about an allergic inflammatory response with resultant allergic symptoms when exposed to only small amounts of the offending allergen.

Nearly one out of four people may have all of the symptoms identical to someone with allergies, without the immune response. This is called non-allergic rhinitis or non-allergic asthma. We do not have a clear understanding of the cause, but strong smells, aerosols, tobacco smoke and other irritants may trigger it.

Is dust allergy a sign of a dirty house?

No. A dirty house can make a house dust allergy problem worse, however. Normal housekeeping procedures may not be enough to get rid of house dust allergy symptoms. This is because many of the substances in dust cannot be removed by normal cleaning procedures. Vigorous cleaning methods can actually put more dust into the air making symptoms worse. Even if the house is very clean, some people are so allergic that even minimal exposures may trigger their symptoms.

Dust Mite Allergy

Dust mites are the most common cause of allergy from house dust. They belong to the family of eight-legged creatures called arachnids that also includes spiders, chiggers and ticks. Dust mites are hardy creatures that live and multiply easily in warm, humid places. They prefer temperatures at or above 70 degrees Fahrenheit with a relative humidity of 75 percent to 80 percent and die when the humidity falls below 40 percent to 50 percent. They are infrequently found in dry climates.

High levels of exposure to dust mite have been shown to be an important factor in the development of asthma in children. People who are allergic to dust mites react to proteins within the bodies and feces of the mites. These fecal particles are found in the highest concentrations in pillows, mattresses, carpeting and upholstered furniture. They float into the air when anyone vacuums, walks on a carpet or disturbs bedding, but settle out of the air soon after the disturbance is over. Dust mite-allergic people who inhale these particles frequently experience allergy symptoms. There may be many as 19,000 dust mites in one gram of dust, but usually between 100 to 500 mites live in each gram. (A gram is about the weight of a paper clip.) Each mite produces about 10 to 20 waste particles per day and lives for 30 days. Egg-laying females can add 25 to 30 new mites to the population during their lifetime.

Mites eat particles of skin and dander, so they thrive in places where there are people and animals. Dust mites don't bite, cannot spread diseases and usually do not live on people. They are harmful only to people who become allergic to them. While usual household insecticides have no effect on dust mites, there are ways to reduce exposure to dust mites in the home. (See below)

Cockroach Allergy

As unappealing as it seems, many houses do have dust that contains parts of cockroaches. This is most common in older, multifamily housing and in the southern United States where complete extermination of cockroaches is very difficult. Individuals allergic to cockroach protein, particularly those with asthma, tend to have increased symptoms if they live in such houses. You do not have to actually see cockroaches to have a problem. The allergen is derived from saliva, fecal material, secretions, skin casts, and body parts. It is usually at the highest levels in kitchens, but may be found throughout the home, including the bedroom and bed. The levels in bedrooms may be most associated with sensitization and disease. Significant levels may be found in schools and commercial buildings. Cockroaches require food and moisture to survive, so eliminating sources of each can help reduce exposure.

Indoor Mold Allergy

Molds found indoors originally enter from the outdoors, but may multiply indoor under the right conditions. All houses breathe (exchange air in and out), so it is possible to see relatively high levels of molds inside if they are high outside. Any house can develop a mold problem given the right conditions. Certain molds, such as Aspergillus and Penicillium are more commonly found indoors. You might not see it growing on the walls, but it may still be present in your home. Molds require two factors to grow indoors: (1) free moisture from condensation, leakage from pipes or foundations, or any ongoing source of water; and (2) something to grow on that provides them a food source. Molds particularly like to grow on wallboard, damp wood, fabrics, leather, and paper products; however, they can also grow on concrete or the dirt on windows or window frames. We all know that food products, particularly vegetables, fruits, and breads provide a good place for mold to grow.

The mold does not come from "inside" these products. Molds spread by producing spores that can become airborne when they are disturbed directly or by air currents. These spores end up on surfaces where they grow. Dust from mold-contaminated houses can cause allergy symptoms if a person who is allergic to the mold inhales them. Some molds produce bad odors. These odors may be irritating (like any strong odors) without actually causing an allergic response. Disturbing mold reservoirs, such as construction from remodeling can cause indoor mold counts to rise dramatically and thus, containment precautions should be taken to decrease potential exposure. In addition, nearby agricultural activity can stir up mold spores in the air and cause a large influx of airborne indoor mold concentrations.

Animal Allergies

Cats and dogs are the most common cause of animal allergies, but any warm-blooded animals (guinea pigs, hamsters, etc) can trigger an allergic response. It's not just the hair or skin particles that contain the allergens, but also the urine and saliva. Recent studies have shown that even the house mouse can trigger allergies if present in sufficient numbers. Allergens from domestic animals, especially cats, may be carried on the clothing of pet owners outside the home into the work place and schools. In fact, cat allergen, is one of the most common allergens found in the dust in schools. There are no "non-allergenic" cats or dogs. While recent research attempts to develop a cat that does not emit the "major" cat allergen, in fact most people are also allergic to multiple "minor" cat allergens. Another confusing issue has been large population (epidemiologic) studies reporting the "benefits" of exposure to indoor animals in reducing the development of allergies in children. This theory (Hygiene Hypothesis) may be true, but does not apply to someone who already has developed animal allergies or is beyond the first few months of life. In addition, since the response is unpredictable, it is not recommended as a way to prevent allergies from developing.

How do I know if I have an allergy?

If you think you may have an allergy to any of the components of house dust, consult a board certified allergist-immunologist. To pinpoint the cause of your symptoms, the allergist will ask detailed questions about your work and home environments, family medical history, frequency and severity of symptoms, exposure to pets and a variety of other questions. Sometimes the history will reveal obvious triggers, like someone who develops symptoms every time they are around a certain animal. More often though, the history may suggest triggers, but it may not be obvious in identifying the exact ones. Sometimes the medical history may not suggest any triggers or precipitating factors, yet allergy may be the cause. In this case, your allergist finds out what you are allergic to by doing skin tests. This involves either pricking the skin (prick tests) or injecting into the skin (intradermal tests) with different allergens and observing for a reaction. A positive reaction (a raised welt with redness around it) may indicate that you are allergic to that allergen. Skin testing is very sensitive and is still the "gold standard" for identifying inhalant allergies. Occasionally, your allergist may order a blood test in addition to the skin test to confirm the diagnosis of allergy. The blood tests are generally less sensitive than skin testing.

What can I do to relieve house dust allergy symptoms?

Once the triggers of your allergies have been identified with the help of the allergist, targeted avoidance measures are very important to initiate. Research has confirmed that targeted avoidance (environmental control aimed at relevant triggers) can be as effective as medications in reducing symptoms. The usual case requires targeted avoidance, medications prescribed by your allergist, and in many cases, specific allergen immunotherapy (allergy shots) to bring the problems under control.

Tips for reducing allergen & particulate exposure.

1. NO SMOKING inside the home at any time. (Benefits everyone.)

2. Measure the indoor humidity and keep it below 55% - 60%. Do not use vaporizers or humidifiers. You may need a dehumidifier. Use vent fans in bathrooms and when cooking to remove moisture. Repair all water leaks. (Dust mite, cockroach, and mold allergies). Excellent references regarding mold prevention and remediation can be found at http://www.epa.gov/mold and http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/epi/moldrpt1.shtml.

3. Remove wall-to-wall carpets from the bedroom if possible. Use a central vacuum or a vacuum with a HEPA filter regularly. If you are allergic, wear a N95 filter mask while dusting, sweeping, or vacuuming. Remember, it takes over 2 hours for the dust to settle back down, so if possible clean when the allergic patient is away and don't clean the bedroom at night. (Dust mite, animal, and mold allergies, particulates)

4. Keep pets out of the bedroom at ALL times. Consider using a HEPA Air Cleaner in the bedroom. It is best, to remove the animal from the home. (animal allergies)

5. Encase mattresses and pillows with "mite-proof" covers. Wash all bed linens regularly using hot water. (dust mite allergy)

6. Do not leave out uncovered food at night. Dispose of food wastes (including fast food wraps) in a tightly sealed garbage can. Use roach traps. Schedule regular professional pest control utilizing integrated pest management (IPM) methods. (Cockroach and mouse allergy, mold)

7. Vent gas appliances and fireplaces to the outside and maintain regularly. There is no such thing as a safe, ventless fireplace. Do not store wood in the house. (Particulates, mold allergy)

8. If you have an attached garage, do not start the car and let it run in the garage, even with the garage doors open. Do not store volatile chemicals like insecticides, gas, etc. in an attached garage. (Particulates, VOCs)

9. Install a high efficiency media filter with a MERV rating of 11 or 12 in the furnace and air-conditioning unit. Leave the fan on to create a "whole house" air filter that removes particulates. Change the filter at least every three months (with the change of the seasons) to keep the air cleaner year round. Have your heating and air-conditioning units inspected and serviced every six months. (Particulates, animal mold, dust mite allergy)

10. Your board-certified allergist is the best resource for effective help with these issues. Many expensive, unproven products are of no benefit.


Food Allergies


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Many types of food can cause allergic reactions in middle childhood. The most common of these are cow's milk and other dairy products, egg whites, poultry, seafood, wheat, nuts, soy and chocolate.

Allergies are caused by antibodies that the body's immune system produces, which react to a component of a particular food and then release chemicals that cause allergic symptoms like a runny nose, sneezing, coughing and itching. Children may also experience stomach pain, bloating, cramping, diarrhea, skin rashes and swelling. Although these reactions can occur almost immediately after consuming these foods, they may be delayed for hours or sometimes even days.

Diagnosing food allergies is not easy. Identical symptoms may be caused by other disorders, and pinpointing the offending food can be difficult. Your pediatrician may refer your child to an allergist, who has several diagnostic options. The allergist might suggest an elimination diet, a procedure in which suspicious foods are removed from the diet for a period of time and symptoms are closely monitored to see if they subside. After several weeks the foods are reintroduced one by one, and allergic responses are again evaluated to determine which food, if any, is really the cause of the problem.

Your doctor might also use skin and blood tests. He or she might prick the skin on your child's back or arm, and then introduce a liquid extract of the suspicious food to see if a response - swelling and itchiness, for example - takes place. However, while the validity of this test is widely accepted in diagnosing airborne allergies, there is controversy about its reliability in detecting food allergies.

Some doctors also use the RAST test, in which a sample of your child's blood is mixed with food extracts. Then the blood is evaluated to determine whether antibodies to that food are present. The reliability of this test may vary from laboratory to laboratory.

Once an offending food has been identified, your doctor will probably recommend that it be removed from your child's diet. This means not only eliminating eggs, for example, but also all products that contain them. As a result, you may have to become more diligent reading labels in the supermarket. A child allergic to wheat gluten, for instance, may have to avoid most grains, including cookies, pies, cakes, and pasta, as well as processed cheese, salad dressings and many other foods. The situation becomes even more challenging if your child is allergic to several food items.

Ask your doctor to suggest alternatives to the foods to which your child is allergic. Can egg substitutes be used for a youngster allergic to eggs? When a child is allergic to milk, should she eat additional protein-rich foods (legumes, chicken, fish, meat) and calcium-rich items (sardines, broccoli, spinach)? Can other products be consumed in place of cow's milk? If your child is allergic to wheat, can you cook with corn flour or rice flour instead?

Excerpted from "Caring for Your School-Age Child: Ages 5-12" Bantam 1999




ABC News with Dr. Bassett


VISIT DR. BASSETT'S NEW WEB SITE: nyc-allergist.com


Tips for Seasonal Allergies, 4/23/08
Patients share their stories of how they have coped with seasonal allergies.

What Are Allergies? 4/23/08
The three most common allergies: How are they diagnosed and treated?

Drug Allergies, 4/23/08
How do you know if you have one?

Food Allergy 101, 4/23/08
What are the most common foods known to cause allergies?

The Future of Treatment, 4/22/08
Find out new treatments on the horizon.

About


VISIT DR. BASSETT'S NEW WEB SITE: nyc-allergist.com



Clifford W. Bassett, M.D., F.A.C.A.A.I., F.A.A.A.A.I.
Diplomate, American Board of Allergy and Immunology



Affiliations
Faculty: New York University School of Medicine
Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine: SUNY-Health Sciences Center

Attending:
? New York University Medical Center
? NYU Downtown Hospital, New York, NY
? St. Vincent's Hospital and Medical Center, New York, NY
? Continuum Health Partners/The Long Island College Hospital, Bklyn, NY

Fellow: American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology
? Chairman, PR Committee

Fellow: American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology
? Member, Food and Adverse Reactions Committee
? Member, Sinusitis Committee
? Member, Practice Parameters Subcommittee
? Member, Public Education Committee

Executive Committee, New York Allergy and Asthma Society


Publications
As an investigator in clinical trials, Dr. Bassett has published papers in:
? Journal of Allergy, Asthma and Clinical Immunology.
? Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.
? Journal of Pediatrics.
? Chest.

He has co-authored Chapter 9, "Public Perception of Food Allergy"
of a leading textbook, "Food Hypersensitivity & Adverse Reactions,
A Practical Guide for Diagnosis and Management: First Edition,"
published by Marcel Dekker, 1999.


Presentations and Scientific Exhibits
American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Meeting, November 2000. "Hussain S, Bassett CW, Kaplan S, Schneider AT. Correlation Between the Color of Cat Hair and Severity of Allergic Symptoms in Patients with Allergic Rhinitis."

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting, November 2000. "Pasternak P, Bassett CW, Rao YAK, Schneider AT. Anaphylaxis in a Child with Food Allergies and Wool Hypersensitivity."

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting, November 2000. "Bassett CW, Pina D, Amara S, Silverman BA, Schneider AT. Asthma Severity, Psychiatric Morbidity & Quality of Life: Correlation with Inhaled Corticosteroid Dose."

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting, March 2000. "Pasternak P, Silverman B, Bassett C, Schneider AT. Effects of Inhaled Corticosteroids on Growth in Children."

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology,Annual Meeting, March 2000. "Amara S, Pina D, Bonala S, Bassett C, Silverman B, Schneider AT. Prevalence of Psychiatric Symptoms in a Population of Urban Adult Outpatients with Asthma, and Their Quality of Life".

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting, November 1999. "Hussain S, Bassett CW, Silverman BS, Schneider AT. Cocaine (intranasal) Induced Acute Urticaria and Associated Bronchospasm in a 24 Year Old Woman."

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting, November 1999. "Pasternak P, Silverman B, Bassett C, Rao YAK, Schneider AT. Effects of Inhaled Corticosteroid on Growth and Weight Velocity."

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting, November 1999. "Bonala S, Reddy MB, Silverman B, Bassett C, Amara S, Rao YAK, Schneider AT. Bone Mineral Density in Women with Asthma on Long Term Corticosteroid Therapy."

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Meeting, February 1999. "Najib NM, Chowdhry IA, Silverman BA, Vilar ME, Bassett CW, Rao YAK, Schneider AT. Skin Sensitivity to Common Aeroallergens in Perennial Allergic Rhinitis."

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Meeting, February 1999. "Najib NM, Chowdhry IA, Silverman BA, Aguilar JA, Vilar ME, Amara SR, Bassett CW, Rao YAK, Schneider AT. Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria ? Skin Sensivitiy to Common Aeroallergens."

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting, March 1998. "Reddy ABM, Vilar ME, Silverman BA, Bassett CW, Rao YAK, Chiaramonte LT, Schneider AT: Osteoporosis Among Adult Asthma Patients Receiving Chronic Corticosteroid Therapy."

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting, November 1998. Oral Presentation. "Vilar ME, Silverman B, Bassett C, Rao YAK, Schneider AT. Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis as Presenting Sign of Cystic Fibrosis in an Elderly Man."

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting, November 1998. Oral Presentation. "Najib NM, Chowdhry IA, Silverman B, Bassett C, Rao YAK, Schneider AT. Exposure and Skin Sensitivity to the Severity of Asthma in Inner-City Asthmatics."

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting, November 1998. "Najib NM, Chowdhry IA, Aguilar JA, Silverman B, Bassett C, Rao YAK, Schneider AT. Noncompliant Adolescent with Hereditary Angioedema Required Tracheostomy."

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting March 1998. "Vilar ME, Reddy BM, Silverman BA, Bassett CW, Chiaramonte LT, Schneider AT. Osteoporosis Among Adult Asthma Patients Receiving Chronic Corticosteroid Therapy."

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting February 1997. "Vilar ME, Reddy BM, Silverman BA, Bassett CW, Chiaramonte LT, Schneider AT. Retrospective Analysis of an Allergy/Asthma Treatment Program in Inner City Asthma Patients."

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting February 1997. "Wheeler GA, Bassett CW, Silverman BA, Chiaramonte LT. Isolated Depressed C4 Level in a Patient with Physical Urticaria."

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting, November 1996. "Reddy BM, Chiramonte LT, Silverman B, Bassett CW. Clinical Characteristics of Urticaria in an Inner City Population."


American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting March 1994. "Talusan-Canlas E, Bassett CW, Dolan C. Emergency Room Utilization by Asthmatics in an Urban Hospital."

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting March 1994. "Bassett CW, Talusan-Canlas, Hotlin L, Kumar S. An Adverse Reaction to Propofol in a Patient with Egg Hypersensitivity."

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology, Annual Meeting, March 1998. "Chowdhry A, Najib NM, Silverman BA, Bassett CW, Schneider AT: Skin Sensitivity to Common Aeroallergens in Inner City Asthmatics."

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting November 1993. "Fear and Loneliness in Asthma: A Psychodynamic Perspective."

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting November 1993. "Streptococcal Tonsillitis Masquerading as Acute Allergic Urticaria."

World Congress of Chest Physicians, Annual Meeting June 1993. "Correlation of Asthma and Severe Anxiety."

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting March 1993. "Demographic Analysis of Urban Asthma in Brooklyn, New York".

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting 1992. "Asthma and Anxiety: A New Look."

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Annual Meeting 1992. "Public Perception of Food Allergy."

International Life Sciences Institutes 1992 Symposium of "Food Allergy and the Lung. " and "Public Perception of Food Allergy."


Published Papers
Puvvada L, Silverman B, Bassett CW, Chiaramonte LT. "Systemic Reactions to MMR Skin Testing." Pediatrics: 91:835:1993.

Bonala SB, Reddy BM, Silverman BA, Bassett CW, Rao YAK, Amara S, Schneider AT. "Bone Mineral Density in Women with Asthma on Long Term Inhaled Corticosteroid Therapy." Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology: 85:2000.

Vilar ME, Najib NM, Bassett CW, Silverman BA, Schneider AT, Giusti RT, Rosa UW. "Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis as Presenting Sign of Cystic Fibrosis in an Elderly Man." Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology: 85:70:2000.

Vilar ME, Reddy BM, Bassett CW, Silverman BA, Schneider AT, Rao YAK. "Superior Clinical Outcomes of Inner City Asthma Patients Treated in an Allergy Clinic." Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology: 84:299:2000.

Bonala S, Reddy MB, Silverman B, Bassett C, Amara s, Rao YAK, Schneider AT. "Bone Mineral Density in Women with Asthma on Long Term Inhaled Corticosteroid Therapy." Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology: 84:138:2000.

Pasternak PL, Silverman BA, Bassett CW, Schneider AT. "Effects of Inhaled Corticosteroids on Growth and Weight Velocity." Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology: 84:160:2000.

Amara S, Pina D, Bonala S, Bassett CW, Silverman BA, Schneider AT. Abstract. "Prevalence of Psychiatric Symptoms in a Population of Urban Adult Outpatients with Asthma and Their Quality of Life." Journal of Allergy, Asthma and Clinical Immunology: 105:S105:2000.

Pasternak PL, Silverman BA, Bassett CW, Schneider AT. Abstract. "Effects of Inhaled Corticosteroids on Growth in Children." Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: 105: S105:2000.

Chowdhry IA, Aguilar JA, Najib NM, Vilar ME, Vilar ME, Amara SR, Silverman BA, Bassett CW, Rao YAK, Schneider AT. Abstract. "Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria ? Skin Sensitivity to Common Aeroallergens." JACI: 103:S 151: 1999.

Chowdhry IA, Aguilar JA, Najib NM, Vilar ME, Vilar ME, Silverman BA, Bassett CW, Rao YAK, Schneider AT. Abstract "Skin Test Sensitivity to Common Aeroallergens in Perennial Allergic Rhinitis." JACI 103:S24:1999.

Chowdhry IA, Najib NM, Vilar ME, Silverman BA, Bassett CW, Schneider AT. Abstract "Correlation of Pet Exposure and Skin Test Sensitivity to the Severity of Inner City Asthmatics." Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. 82:101:1999.

Reddy BM, Vilar MB, Silverman MA, Bassett CW, Schneider At. Abstract "Bone Mineral Density in Women with Asthma on Long Term Inhaled Corticosteroid Therapy." JACI 103:S229:1999.

Aguilar JA, Chowdhry IA, Najib NM, Silverman BS, Bassett CW, Schneider AT. "Noncompliant Adolescent Female with Hereditary Angioedema Required Tracheostomy." Abstract. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology 82:119:1999.

Aguilar JA, Chowdhry IA, Najib NM, Silverman BS, Bassett CW, Schneider AT. Abstract. "Allergy to Common Aeroallergens in Asthmatics." JACI 101:750:1998.

Vilar ME, Reddy BM, Silverman BA, Bassett C et al. "Comparison of Health-Related Quality of Life in Inner City Asthma Patients Followed and Those Not Followed in an Asthma Center." JACI, January 1998.

Chowdhry JA, Najib NM, Silverman BA, Bassett C et. al. "Skin Sensitivity to Common Aeroallergens in Inner City Asthmatics." JACI, January 1998.

Vilar ME, Bassett C, Rao YAK, Chiaramonte LT. Abstract. "A 71 Year Old Woman with Cutaneous Eruption After Taking One Dose of Cefprozil." Annals of Allergy, 1997.

Reddy BM, Bassett C, Silverman B, Chiaramonte LT. Abstract. "Retrospective Analysis: Clinical Characteristics of Urticaria in an Inner City Population." Pending publication, Annals of Allergy, 1997.

Vilar ME, Reddy BM, Bassett C, Silverman B, Chiaramonte LT. Abstract: Retrospective Analysis of an Allergy and Asthma Treatment Program in Inner City Asthma Patients. Pending Publication, JACI, 1997.

Wheeler GA, Bassett C, Silverman B, Chiaramonte LT. Abstract. "Isolated Depressed C4 Level in a Patient with Physical Urticaria." JACI, 1997.

Bassett C, Talusan E, Holtzin L, Kumar S. Abstract. "An Adverse Reaction to Propofol in a Patient with Egg Hypersensitivity." Accepted for publication in JACI 1994.

Talusan E, Tio R, Bassett C, Dolan C, Chiaramonte LT. Abstract. "Emergency Room Utilization by Asthmatics in an Urban Hospital." Accepted for publication in JACI 1994.

Tio R, Schwartz L, Talusan E, Silverman B, Bassett C. Abstract. "Seasonal variation in cockroach skin reactivity." Accepted for publication in Annals of Allergy 1993.

Schwartz L, Tio R, Indaram J, Bassett C, Silverman B. Abstract. "Is House Dust Immunotherapy Obsolete?" Accepted for publication in Annals of Allergy 1993.

Puuvada L, Silverman B, Bassett C, Chiaramonte LT. Abstract. "Systemic Reactions to MMR Skin Testing." Pediatrics Volume 91, April 1993.

Bassett C, Talusan E, Silverman B, Chiaramonte LT. Abstract. "Correlation of Asthma and Severe Anxiety." Chest, 1993.

Bassett C, Wolfsohn R. Abstract. "Asthma and Anxiety. A New Look." Annals of Allergy, 1993.

Bassett C, Altman D, Chiaramonte LT. Abstract. "Public Perception of Food Allergy." JACI Volume 89, No. 1, Pt 2 January 1992.

Associates


VISIT DR. BASSETT'S NEW WEB SITE: nyc-allergist.com


Dr. Alan O. Khadavi, MD

Diplomate, American Board of Allergy and Immunology
Diplomate, American Board of Pediatrics

Same locations and phone numbers as for Dr. Bassett.


Dr. Michael Raffinan, Diplomate Board of Family Medicine

Dr. Raffinan is a family physician who treats patients of all ages for their general medical care needs, such as physicals, preventive health screenings, well woman/gyn exams, child health exams, std screening, sick visits, vaccinations routine and travel.

He has built a reputation of excellent medical care and availability. In Washington, D.C. Dr. Raffinan was recognized as one of the top physicians in the Washington, D. C./Baltimore area by a the D.C. regional magazine, The Washingtonian (similar to New York Magazine).

His office offers same day appointments as well as advanced scheduled appointments. His office and staff use technology to deliver more efficient care, using electronic medical records, online scheduling, refills, and patient portal to obtain results and notes from prior visits.

His approach is to focus on you as the patient and how to get the best health and the best care. For more information, please just ask or check the website.

www.raff.yourmd.com
212.537.5039 (one phone number for both locations)


Preferred Pharmacy: Thompson Chemists
Soho, NY, 212-598-9790.

Patient Form


VISIT DR. BASSETT'S NEW WEB SITE: nyc-allergist.com

It will save you a lot of time if you print and
fill in our form before you come to our offices.

Click here for the New Patient Form

See you soon!


Patient Info


VISIT DR. BASSETT'S NEW WEB SITE: nyc-allergist.com



Recommended book:

Sinus Relief Now by Jordan S. Josephson, M.D.


Recommended Web sites:

Asthma Therapy Assessment Questionnaire

Allergy & Asthma Network/Mothers of Asthmatics

Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Online

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

Asthma & Allergy Foundation of America

Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network

Pollen & Spore Counts of National Allergy Bureau

Pollen.com


Seasonal Allergy Survival Tips 2008


VISIT DR. BASSETT'S NEW WEB SITE: nyc-allergist.com


What's New About Your Allergies?
Cross-reactions between pollen and food allergies

Beat the clock.
Do not exercise outdoors between 5 a.m. And 10 a.m. Wait until early evening when pollen counts are typically lower, or ideally exercise indoors on high pollen days. Pollen levels rise on dry, windy days are lower on wet, cloudy and windless days.

Check the pollen count.
Websites such as www.aaaai.org (american academy of allergy, asthma and immunology national allergy bureau) will provide you with your neighborhood allergy forecast.

Wash wisely.
Shower and shampoo your hair every night, and change your clothing before entering your bedroom to remove pollen that collects during the day.

Clear the air.
At home or when driving, keep windows closed and set air conditioner on re-circulate to keep out the pollens. Also, do not forget to change or wash air conditioner filters frequently.

Avoid cross-reactions.
Ingesting foods such as apple, carrot, pears, hazelnut may cause an allergy reaction (tingling of the mouth, itchy throat) if you have seasonal pollen allergies due to a cross-reaction between the proteins in these fruits and the pollens.

Vacation by the sea.
Take a vacation by the beach or sea as pollen counts are often lower.

Block your eyes.
Wear sunglasses to block pollens from getting into your eyes.



 



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